Terracotta Roofing Tiles

Terracotta Roofing Tiles

Long Lasting – 50 Year Warranty With a 50 year warranty, Boral Terracotta tiles are manufactured to last and will make a beautiful and hardwearing roof for your home. Each terracotta tile has a vitrified body that makes it impervious to air and water borne pollutants and able to withstand exposure to Australia’s harsh UV light without breaking down. The 50 year warranty on Boral Terracotta tiles is provided to all terracotta tiles and customers regardless of the location of the property. Colour Retention Unlike other materials, Terracotta roofing substantially retains its appearance with age, maintaining the aesthetic appearance of your home over time. Terracotta tiles are crafted from select natural clays that are kiln-fired to temperatures of 1100°C for exceptional character and strength with high colour retention and low maintenance. Salt Safe & Frost Resistant All Boral Terracotta tiles are salt safe and frost resistant making them suitable for any location including coastal areas and sites with close proximity to breaking surf. Thermal Performance The thermal performance of a roof refers to how it affects the temperature within a house and relates to the energy used within the house to maintain the temperature at a comfortable level. Add to the in thermal performance by using sarking, increased insulation, a lighter roof colour and changes in the overall design considerations. Acoustic Performance Enjoy more peace and quiet with terracotta roof tiles as their density helps reduce the external sound such as traffic, aircrafts and trains. In fact, roof tiles have a sound reduction potential of 30 decibels as opposed to only 12 decibels for the most commonly used alternative¹. ¹Cement and Concrete Association of Australia Technical Report. TR/F81. Sept. 1984, Roof Tile Association of Australia Low Maintenance Once Terracotta roof tiles installed they have negligible maintenance requirements for the life of the roof. Should a section of the roof ever be damaged or require modification (e.g. installing a skylight), only the affected tiles usually require replacement or removal. Fire Resistance Boral Terracotta roof tiles are non-combustible and can be safely used in bush fire-prone areas. In areas assessed as BAL – 12 to BAL – 40, sarking with a flammability index of not more than 5 must be installed under the tiles and cover the whole roof. In BAL -FZ areas, specific construction requirements can be obtained at www.rtaa.com.au. Rainwater & Tank Safety Boral Terracotta roof tiles are non-toxic and provided your roof is clean and healthy, can be suitable for the collection of rainwater for reuse. Boral Terracotta roof tiles are manufactured to AS 2049 ensuring the surface treatment is free of any elements or chemicals in concentrations known to be hazardous to health. For more information on Boral Terracotta Roof Tiles call 1300 134 002 >Boral Swiss (Terracotta) Roof Tiles >Boral French (Terracotta) Roof Tiles >Boral Terracotta Shingle™ >Download Why Terracotta Roof Tiles Brochure Roofing Insights Main 01 Introduction 02 Why Roof Tiles? 03 Benefits of Terracotta 04 Benefits of Concrete 05 Choosing a Roof Tile 06 Roof Tile Photo Gallery 07 Basix 08 FAQS 09 Basic Roofing Terms
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Terracotta Roofing Tiles

Long Lasting – 50 Year Warranty With a 50 year warranty, Boral Terracotta tiles are manufactured to last and will make a beautiful and hardwearing roof for your home. Each terracotta tile has a vitrified body that makes it impervious to air and water borne pollutants and able to withstand exposure to Australia’s harsh UV light without breaking down. The 50 year warranty on Boral Terracotta tiles is provided to all terracotta tiles and customers regardless of the location of the property. Colour Retention Unlike other materials, Terracotta roofing substantially retains its appearance with age, maintaining the aesthetic appearance of your home over time. Terracotta tiles are crafted from select natural clays that are kiln-fired to temperatures of 1100°C for exceptional character and strength with high colour retention and low maintenance. Salt Safe & Frost Resistant All Boral Terracotta tiles are salt safe and frost resistant making them suitable for any location including coastal areas and sites with close proximity to breaking surf. Thermal Performance The thermal performance of a roof refers to how it affects the temperature within a house and relates to the energy used within the house to maintain the temperature at a comfortable level. Add to the in thermal performance by using sarking, increased insulation, a lighter roof colour and changes in the overall design considerations. Acoustic Performance Enjoy more peace and quiet with terracotta roof tiles as their density helps reduce the external sound such as traffic, aircrafts and trains. In fact, roof tiles have a sound reduction potential of 30 decibels as opposed to only 12 decibels for the most commonly used alternative¹. ¹Cement and Concrete Association of Australia Technical Report. TR/F81. Sept. 1984, Roof Tile Association of Australia Low Maintenance Once Terracotta roof tiles installed they have negligible maintenance requirements for the life of the roof. Should a section of the roof ever be damaged or require modification (e.g. installing a skylight), only the affected tiles usually require replacement or removal. Fire Resistance Boral Terracotta roof tiles are non-combustible and can be safely used in bush fire-prone areas. In areas assessed as BAL – 12 to BAL – 40, sarking with a flammability index of not more than 5 must be installed under the tiles and cover the whole roof. In BAL -FZ areas, specific construction requirements can be obtained at www.rtaa.com.au. Rainwater & Tank Safety Boral Terracotta roof tiles are non-toxic and provided your roof is clean and healthy, can be suitable for the collection of rainwater for reuse. Boral Terracotta roof tiles are manufactured to AS 2049 ensuring the surface treatment is free of any elements or chemicals in concentrations known to be hazardous to health. For more information on Boral Terracotta Roof Tiles call 1300 134 002 >Boral Swiss (Terracotta) Roof Tiles >Boral French (Terracotta) Roof Tiles >Boral Terracotta Shingle™ >Download Why Terracotta Roof Tiles Brochure
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Terracotta Roofing Tiles

During the 17th and 18th centuries the most common type of clay roofing tiles used in America were flat and rectangular. They measured approximately 10″ x 6″ x Ω” (25cm x 15cm x 1.25cm), and had two nail or peg holes at one end through which they were anchored to the roofing laths. Sometimes a strip of mortar was placed between the overlapping rows of tile to prevent the tiles from lifting in high winds. In addition to flat tiles, interlocking S-shaped pantiles were also used in the 18th century. These were formed by molding clay over tapered sections of logs, and were generally quite large. Alternately termed pan, crooked, or Flemish tiles, and measuring approximately 14 Ω” x 9 Ω” (37cm x 24cm), these interlocking tiles were hung on roofing lath by means of a ridge or lug located on the upper part of the underside of each tile. Both plain (flat) tile and pantile (S-shaped or curved) roofs were capped at the ridge with semicircular ridge tiles. Clay roofing tiles on buildings in mid-18th century Moravian settlements in Pennsylvania closely resembled those used in Germany at the time. These tiles were about 14″-15″ long x 6″-7″ wide (36cm-38cm x 15cm-18cm) with a curved butt, and with vertical grooves to help drainage. They were also designed with a lug or nib on the back so that the tiles could hang on lath without nails or pegs.
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Terracotta Roofing Tiles

Clay roofing tiles, as noted before, frequently outlast their fastening systems. Wood pegs rot, nails rust, and even copper nails that are not adequately driven in can pull out of the roof’s structural members. Although it is unusual that all of the clay tiles on a roof need to be replaced unless matching replacements cannot be obtained, it is not uncommon for old tile roofs to be stripped of all their tiles in order to relay the tiles with new fastenings and battens. When the fastening system has failed, all the roof tiles must be removed and reattached with new corrosion-resistant fasteners. If possible, all the tiles should be numbered and a diagram should be drawn showing the location of each tile to aid in replicating the original pattern and color variations when the tiles are relaid. Ideally, each tile should be numbered to ensure that it is reinstalled in its original location. But this may not always be feasible or practical, and it may be enough simply to group the tiles as they are removed by type and size or function-such as field tiles, custom tiles for hips, dormers and ridges, and specially cut pieces. This will help facilitate reinstallation of the tiles. If all of the tiles have to be removed, it is probably a good idea to consider installing a layer of modern roofing felt over the wood sheathing. This will add another layer of waterproofing, while providing temporary protection during reroofing.
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Terracotta Roofing Tiles

Unlike many other roofing materials, the color of terracotta roofing tiles is able to hold up strikingly well over time, retaining their reddish-clay hue no matter the type of weather that strikes. Terracotta is highly frost-resistant, which is particularly useful during the winter months, though the level of this resistance can vary based on the tile quality. It does not require much work to properly maintain these tiles. Terracotta tiles are highly fire-resistant.

Terracotta Roofing Tiles

Terracotta Roofing Tiles