Terracotta Roof Tiles

Terracotta Roof Tiles

Long Lasting – 50 Year Warranty With a 50 year warranty, Boral Terracotta tiles are manufactured to last and will make a beautiful and hardwearing roof for your home. Each terracotta tile has a vitrified body that makes it impervious to air and water borne pollutants and able to withstand exposure to Australia’s harsh UV light without breaking down. The 50 year warranty on Boral Terracotta tiles is provided to all terracotta tiles and customers regardless of the location of the property. Colour Retention Unlike other materials, Terracotta roofing substantially retains its appearance with age, maintaining the aesthetic appearance of your home over time. Terracotta tiles are crafted from select natural clays that are kiln-fired to temperatures of 1100°C for exceptional character and strength with high colour retention and low maintenance. Salt Safe & Frost Resistant All Boral Terracotta tiles are salt safe and frost resistant making them suitable for any location including coastal areas and sites with close proximity to breaking surf. Thermal Performance The thermal performance of a roof refers to how it affects the temperature within a house and relates to the energy used within the house to maintain the temperature at a comfortable level. Add to the in thermal performance by using sarking, increased insulation, a lighter roof colour and changes in the overall design considerations. Acoustic Performance Enjoy more peace and quiet with terracotta roof tiles as their density helps reduce the external sound such as traffic, aircrafts and trains. In fact, roof tiles have a sound reduction potential of 30 decibels as opposed to only 12 decibels for the most commonly used alternative¹. ¹Cement and Concrete Association of Australia Technical Report. TR/F81. Sept. 1984, Roof Tile Association of Australia Low Maintenance Once Terracotta roof tiles installed they have negligible maintenance requirements for the life of the roof. Should a section of the roof ever be damaged or require modification (e.g. installing a skylight), only the affected tiles usually require replacement or removal. Fire Resistance Boral Terracotta roof tiles are non-combustible and can be safely used in bush fire-prone areas. In areas assessed as BAL – 12 to BAL – 40, sarking with a flammability index of not more than 5 must be installed under the tiles and cover the whole roof. In BAL -FZ areas, specific construction requirements can be obtained at www.rtaa.com.au. Rainwater & Tank Safety Boral Terracotta roof tiles are non-toxic and provided your roof is clean and healthy, can be suitable for the collection of rainwater for reuse. Boral Terracotta roof tiles are manufactured to AS 2049 ensuring the surface treatment is free of any elements or chemicals in concentrations known to be hazardous to health. For more information on Boral Terracotta Roof Tiles call 1300 134 002 >Boral Swiss (Terracotta) Roof Tiles >Boral French (Terracotta) Roof Tiles >Boral Terracotta Shingle™ >Download Why Terracotta Roof Tiles Brochure Roofing Insights Main 01 Introduction 02 Why Roof Tiles? 03 Benefits of Terracotta 04 Benefits of Concrete 05 Choosing a Roof Tile 06 Roof Tile Photo Gallery 07 Basix 08 FAQS 09 Basic Roofing Terms
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Terracotta Roof Tiles

Long Lasting – 50 Year Warranty With a 50 year warranty, Boral Terracotta tiles are manufactured to last and will make a beautiful and hardwearing roof for your home. Each terracotta tile has a vitrified body that makes it impervious to air and water borne pollutants and able to withstand exposure to Australia’s harsh UV light without breaking down. The 50 year warranty on Boral Terracotta tiles is provided to all terracotta tiles and customers regardless of the location of the property. Colour Retention Unlike other materials, Terracotta roofing substantially retains its appearance with age, maintaining the aesthetic appearance of your home over time. Terracotta tiles are crafted from select natural clays that are kiln-fired to temperatures of 1100°C for exceptional character and strength with high colour retention and low maintenance. Salt Safe & Frost Resistant All Boral Terracotta tiles are salt safe and frost resistant making them suitable for any location including coastal areas and sites with close proximity to breaking surf. Thermal Performance The thermal performance of a roof refers to how it affects the temperature within a house and relates to the energy used within the house to maintain the temperature at a comfortable level. Add to the in thermal performance by using sarking, increased insulation, a lighter roof colour and changes in the overall design considerations. Acoustic Performance Enjoy more peace and quiet with terracotta roof tiles as their density helps reduce the external sound such as traffic, aircrafts and trains. In fact, roof tiles have a sound reduction potential of 30 decibels as opposed to only 12 decibels for the most commonly used alternative¹. ¹Cement and Concrete Association of Australia Technical Report. TR/F81. Sept. 1984, Roof Tile Association of Australia Low Maintenance Once Terracotta roof tiles installed they have negligible maintenance requirements for the life of the roof. Should a section of the roof ever be damaged or require modification (e.g. installing a skylight), only the affected tiles usually require replacement or removal. Fire Resistance Boral Terracotta roof tiles are non-combustible and can be safely used in bush fire-prone areas. In areas assessed as BAL – 12 to BAL – 40, sarking with a flammability index of not more than 5 must be installed under the tiles and cover the whole roof. In BAL -FZ areas, specific construction requirements can be obtained at www.rtaa.com.au. Rainwater & Tank Safety Boral Terracotta roof tiles are non-toxic and provided your roof is clean and healthy, can be suitable for the collection of rainwater for reuse. Boral Terracotta roof tiles are manufactured to AS 2049 ensuring the surface treatment is free of any elements or chemicals in concentrations known to be hazardous to health. For more information on Boral Terracotta Roof Tiles call 1300 134 002 >Boral Swiss (Terracotta) Roof Tiles >Boral French (Terracotta) Roof Tiles >Boral Terracotta Shingle™ >Download Why Terracotta Roof Tiles Brochure
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Terracotta Roof Tiles

Terracotta has a lower embodied energy which means less energy is consumed in all processes involved in the manufacturing of a terracotta tiled roof. Terracotta maintains a consistent temperature in your home keeping your home cooler in summer and warmer in winter, lowering your energy bills. The thermal properties and natural materials enhance breathability creating a healthier home with less condensation and mould. Monier Terracotta tiles are made from naturally occurring clays, which means the water running off your roof into rainwater tanks is clean and safe to drink.
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This article covers the senses of terracotta as a medium in sculpture, as in the Terracotta Army and Greek terracotta figurines, and architectural decoration. Asian and European sculpture in porcelain is not covered. Glazed architectural terracotta and its unglazed version as exterior surfaces for buildings were used in Asia for some centuries before becoming popular in the West in the 19th century. Architectural terracotta can also refer to decorated ceramic elements such as antefixes and revetments, which made a large contribution to the appearance of temples and other buildings in the classical architecture of Europe, as well as in the Ancient Near East.
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In the 19th century the possibilities of terracotta decoration of buildings were again appreciated by architects, often using thicker pieces of terracotta, and surfaces that are not flat. The American architect Louis Sullivan is well known for his elaborate glazed terracotta ornamentation, designs that would have been impossible to execute in any other medium. Terracotta and tile were used extensively in the town buildings of Victorian Birmingham, England. By about 1930 the widespread use of concrete and Modernist architecture largely ended the use of terracotta in architecture.
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Unlike many other roofing materials, the color of terracotta roofing tiles is able to hold up strikingly well over time, retaining their reddish-clay hue no matter the type of weather that strikes. Terracotta is highly frost-resistant, which is particularly useful during the winter months, though the level of this resistance can vary based on the tile quality. It does not require much work to properly maintain these tiles. Terracotta tiles are highly fire-resistant.
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Terracotta female figurines were uncovered by archaeologists in excavations of Mohenjo-daro, Pakistan (3000–1500 BC). Along with phallus-shaped stones, these suggest some sort of fertility cult and a belief in a mother goddess. The Burney Relief is an outstanding terracotta plaque from Ancient Mesopotamia of about 1950 BC. In Mesoamerica, the great majority of Olmec figurines were in terracotta. Many ushabti mortuary statuettes were also made of terracotta in Ancient Egypt.
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The Ancient Greeks’ Tanagra figurines were mass-produced mold-cast and fired terracotta figurines, that seem to have been widely affordable in the Hellenistic period, and often purely decorative in function. They were part of a wide range of Greek terracotta figurines, which included larger and higher-quality works such as the Aphrodite Heyl; the Romans too made great numbers of small figurines, often religious. Etruscan art often used terracotta in preference to stone even for larger statues, such as the near life-size Apollo of Veii and the Sarcophagus of the Spouses. Campana reliefs are Ancient Roman terracotta reliefs, originally mostly used to make friezes for the outside of buildings, as a cheaper substitute for stone.
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In the 18th-century unglazed terracotta, which had long been used for preliminary clay models or maquettes that were then fired, became fashionable as a material for small sculptures including portrait busts. It was much easier to work than carved materials, and allowed a more spontaneous approach by the artist. Claude Michel (1738–1814), known as Clodion, was an influential pioneer in France. John Michael Rysbrack (1694–1770), a Flemish portrait sculptor working in England, sold his terracotta modelli for larger works in stone, and produced busts only in terracotta. In the next century the French sculptor Albert-Ernest Carrier-Belleuse made many terracotta pieces, but possibly the most famous is The Abduction of Hippodameia depicting the Greek mythological scene of a centaur kidnapping Hippodameia on her wedding day.