S Tile Roof

S Tile Roof

High Barrel Concrete Roof Tile High Barrel Tiles, or otherwise known as high profile S-Tiles, are semi-cylindrical concrete tiles and the most traditionally recognized of all tile profiles. Our Capistrano high barrel profile is beautiful and timeless, emulating the authentic look of Spanish tile found in the old world. Eagle’s Capistrano profile comes in a vast array of colors from: terracottas to warm earth tones to cool grays and refreshing greens, as well as in exquisite blends that were designed to emulate the classic look of real clay tiles.  Many of these colors and blends are Energy Star® and Cool Roof rated products that can qualify for LEED points and save customers money and energy. While you make think a Capistrano tile roof is suitable for only Spanish or Italian stucco architecture, it actually offers stunning good looks that works with any architectural style, as it pairs well with stucco, stone or brick siding. It is used widely on residential, commercial, military and institutional buildings throughout the United States. If you are unsure if your residential or commercial project will bode well with a Capistrano profile, we highly recommend that you contact one our knowledgeable design professionals who will be happy to assist you during a free consultation.  For more information on this service, visit our Design Center page. View our regional color selections Get Inspired! Add Beauty and Distinction to your Home or Project! Browse TileBrowse Tile Browse Tile High Barrel Concrete Roof Tile High Barrel Concrete Roof Tile Roll Concrete Roof Tile Roll Concrete Roof Tile Flat Concrete Roof Tile Flat Concrete Roof Tile Lightweight Concrete Roof Tile Lightweight Concrete Roof Tile
s tile roof 1

S Tile Roof

High Barrel Concrete Roof Tile High Barrel Tiles, or otherwise known as high profile S-Tiles, are semi-cylindrical concrete tiles and the most traditionally recognized of all tile profiles. Our Capistrano high barrel profile is beautiful and timeless, emulating the authentic look of Spanish tile found in the old world. Eagle’s Capistrano profile comes in a vast array of colors from: terracottas to warm earth tones to cool grays and refreshing greens, as well as in exquisite blends that were designed to emulate the classic look of real clay tiles.  Many of these colors and blends are Energy Star® and Cool Roof rated products that can qualify for LEED points and save customers money and energy. While you make think a Capistrano tile roof is suitable for only Spanish or Italian stucco architecture, it actually offers stunning good looks that works with any architectural style, as it pairs well with stucco, stone or brick siding. It is used widely on residential, commercial, military and institutional buildings throughout the United States. If you are unsure if your residential or commercial project will bode well with a Capistrano profile, we highly recommend that you contact one our knowledgeable design professionals who will be happy to assist you during a free consultation.  For more information on this service, visit our Design Center page. View our regional color selections Get Inspired! Add Beauty and Distinction to your Home or Project!
s tile roof 2

S Tile Roof

You might be tempted to save a little money by leaving your old asphalt shingles in place. While it’s true that this can save you a couple thousand dollars in removal and disposal, it has been shown to dramatically reduce the expected life of your roof. Tiling over an old roof can reduce the life of your roof by as much as 25%, reducing the life of your tile roof to about that of the much cheaper asphalt shingle roof.
s tile roof 3

S Tile Roof

The spread of the roof tile technique has to be viewed in connection with the simultaneous rise of monumental architecture in ancient Greece. Only the newly appearing stone walls, which were replacing the earlier mudbrick and wood walls, were strong enough to support the weight of a tiled roof. As a side-effect, it has been assumed that the new stone and tile construction also ushered in the end of ‘Chinese roof’ (Knickdach) construction in Greek architecture, as they made the need for an extended roof as rain protection for the mudbrick walls obsolete.
s tile roof 4

S Tile Roof

Your house will never be “fire-proof”, but a tile roof can make it “fire resistant”. Clay and concrete have Class A fire ratings. What this means is that your roof won’t catch fire. During the Oakland Hills fire in California, embers falling on roofs were the biggest reason many homes caught fire. Fly-overs of the area afterwards showed that houses with tile roofs were still standing even though temperatures reached around 2,000 degrees Fahrenheit. The biggest fire threat a tile roof faces is if the fire starts inside the home and burns the supports.
s tile roof 5

S Tile Roof

Also remember that a roof will need certain tiles for the point where the sides meet — called “ridge” tiles. Where three or more roof sides meet, such as on a hipped roof, you will need tiles called “apexes”. Ridges will need “end caps” if they aren’t hipped, and the end of a hipped ridge will need a “hip end”. A non-hipped roof will need verge tiles to protect the roof beams underneath (similar to fascia), and any vents will need pipe coverings and cowls to ensure proper protection.

S Tile Roof

The big advantage of a tile roof is its fire resistance. However, don’t get a tile roof expecting a break on your home insurance. While tiles are very fire resistant and therefore preferred in regions prone to fires, they are also very rigid and can become damaged if someone has to go up on the roof for any reason.
s tile roof 7

S Tile Roof

High Barrel Tiles, or otherwise known as high profile S-Tiles, are semi-cylindrical concrete tiles and the most traditionally recognized of all tile profiles. Our Capistrano high barrel profile is beautiful and timeless, emulating the authentic look of Spanish tile found in the old world. Eagle’s Capistrano profile comes in a vast array of colors from: terracottas to warm earth tones to cool grays and refreshing greens, as well as in exquisite blends that were designed to emulate the classic look of real clay tiles.  Many of these colors and blends are Energy Star® and Cool Roof rated products that can qualify for LEED points and save customers money and energy. While you make think a Capistrano tile roof is suitable for only Spanish or Italian stucco architecture, it actually offers stunning good looks that works with any architectural style, as it pairs well with stucco, stone or brick siding. It is used widely on residential, commercial, military and institutional buildings throughout the United States. If you are unsure if your residential or commercial project will bode well with a Capistrano profile, we highly recommend that you contact one our knowledgeable design professionals who will be happy to assist you during a free consultation.  For more information on this service, visit our Design Center page. View our regional color selections Get Inspired! Add Beauty and Distinction to your Home or Project!
s tile roof 8

Tile roofs have been in use since Neolithic times, about 4,000 to 12,000 years ago. Some buildings from ancient Greece and Rome still have their original tile roofs and they still function quite well. While there is no guarantee your tile roof will last for millennia, a reasonably maintained roof can be expected to last for the life of your home and then some.
s tile roof 9

No. Though it may cost a little more for a custom color, tiles can be done in reds, blues, greens, whites, and even purples! Coloring a roof tile can be done for any reason from simple aesthetics to replacing a tile on a very old roof to match the others. While terracotta doesn’t fade, concrete does and clay will darken. A new tile might stand out a bit much!
s tile roof 10

The earliest finds of roof tiles in archaic Greece are documented from a very restricted area around Corinth, where fired tiles began to replace thatched roofs at two temples of Apollo and Poseidon between 700 and 650 BC. Spreading rapidly, roof tiles were within fifty years in evidence for a large number of sites around the Eastern Mediterranean, including Mainland Greece, Western Asia Minor, and Southern and Central Italy. Early roof tiles showed an S-shape, with the pan and cover tile forming one piece. They were rather bulky affairs, weighing around 30 kg (66 lb) apiece. Being more expensive and labour-intensive to produce than thatch, their introduction has been explained by their greatly enhanced fire resistance, which gave desired protection to the costly temples.
s tile roof 11

Production of dutch roof tiles started in the 14th century when city rulers required the use of fireproof materials. At the time, most houses were made of wood and had thatch roofing, which would often cause fires to quickly spread. To satisfy demand, many small roof tile makers began to produce roof tiles by hand. Many of these small factories were built near rivers where there was a ready source of clay and cheap transport.
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migdalia velez 8 months ago helpe.d me a lot to decide what I want Lucille O’Day 11 months ago Very helpful, article answered all my questions and more points I was not aware of. Martha C Marchand More than 1 year ago have a wood slate roof now but would like to install tile. Very helpful. thank you. ss atkinso More than 1 year ago Your article is very informative and straight to the point. Very helpful, indeed. ss atkinso More than 1 year ago I was just wondering about all wood replacement with a new tile roof.  I have to look into financing also.I have tiles at this time and am looking for the same.