Roof Tile Repair

Roof Tile Repair

Ask the Expert: “Can cracked roof tiles be glued?” By Lisa on December 5, 2015 in Ask the Expert, cracked tile, Stories Have you ever wondered what types of questions people “Ask the Expert“? Here’s a recent question from a home inspector, and the response from TRI President and Technical Director, Rick Olson. Question – “I recently inspected a home in that was being sold by a real estate agent who was also the homeowner. There were a number of cracked concrete roof tiles that I observed. The buyer asked me what type of repairs needed to be performed and I told him the only acceptable repairs, according to the roof tile manufacturers, was to replace the broken tiles and that gluing them back together was considered only a temporary “patch.” The homeowner/agent called me after “repairs” in the form of gluing the broken tiles back together was performed and was told by her licensed roofing contractor with 40 years of experience that this was a totally acceptable repair and now she is very upset with me telling the buyer otherwise. Thoughts?” Corner chips like this can be glued. Response – The repair of a broken tile is always an important topic to the roofing professional and does not have a one-size fits all answer. The key is to identify what the broken area represents. As the TRI, our members rely upon the formal codes and local building code official approvals to determine the appropriate steps for a minor repair. In the case of a broken corner that may be about 1-2”, the use of a concrete compatible adhesive may be used. This practice is often used at the transitional flashing areas where a small piece of tile may be needed to complete the aesthetic look. The use of adhesives or wire will help hold the small piece in place. It is also used when a few tiles may have a small broken corner. This tile should be replaced. In the case where damage to the tile was created from a load or impact that has created a full vertical or horizontal break the entire width or length of the tile, the use of adhesive is not recommended. These tiles should be replaced. The benefit of concrete and clay tile installations is the ease with which broken tiles can be replaced. In many applications where battens are used, only the perimeter tiles are attached and therefore sliding the upslope course and lifting out the broken tiles will allow for their replacement. Even when tiles are fastened, the broken tiles can be easily removed and the replacement tile secured back in place without disrupting the balance of the roof. This will ensure the ability to return the roof to its pre-damaged conditioned. The Importance of Proper Layout Riverside, CA – March 1, 2016 – Installation Manual Certification Comments are closed. TRI Training ScheduleLas Vegas, NV – May 2, 2017 – Installation Manual Certification San Diego – May 19, 2017 – Installation Manual Certification Orlando, FL – June 22, 2017 – TRI Florida High Wind Certification & Renewal Denver, CO – October 11, 2017 – Installation Manual Certification Other EventsOrlando, FL – June 22-24, 2017 – FRSA Florida Roofing & Sheet Metal Expo SIGN UP FOR THE TRI TRAINING NEWSLETTER See the latest Training Newsletter
roof tile repair 1

Roof Tile Repair

Plain flat tiles, like roofing slates, are attached to the roof sheathing only with nails. They are laid in a pattern overlapping one another in order to provide the degree of impermeability necessary for the roof covering. Because plain flat tiles overlap in most cases almost as much of one half of the tile, this type of tile roof covering results in a considerably heavier roof than does an interlocking tile roof which does not require that the tiles overlap to such an extent. Interlocking flat tiles form a single layer, and an unbroken roof covering. Although most interlocking tiles on all but the steepest roofs can technically be expected to remain in place because they hang on protruding nibs from the roofing laths or battens, in contemporary roofing practices they are often likely to be nailed for added security. In most cases it is usually a good idea to nail at least every other tile.
roof tile repair 2

Roof Tile Repair

When replacing hard-to-match historic tile, and if matching clay tile cannot be obtained, it may be possible to relocate some of the original tiles to the more prominent locations on the roof where the tile is damaged, and insert the new replacement tile in secondary or rear locations, or other areas where it will not show, such as behind chimney stacks, parapets, and dormer windows. Even though replacement tile may initially match the original historic tile when first installed, it is likely to weather or age to a somewhat different color or hue which will become more obvious with time. Thus, care should be taken to insert new replacement tile in as inconspicuous a location as possible. New, machine-made clay tile or concrete tiles should generally not be used to patch roofs of old, handmade tile because of obvious differences in appearance.
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Roof Tile Repair

Next Up Roofing Component Basics Roofing terminology can be a bit overwhelming. DIY Network offers basic roofing definitions that will help get your project off on the right foot. Simple Home Repairs Nagging little problems are the bane of every homeowner’s existence, and the professionals charge big bucks for repairs. Here are some fast fixes you can do yourself. Roofing Buyer’s Guide Learn how to tell if it’s time to replace your roof, and get information on the latest roofing materials and approximate costs. Tips on Solving Common Toilet Problems Master plumber Ed Del Grande explains how even the average homeowner can easily fix common toilet problems. ‘Raise the Roof’ Historic Home Makeovers You Have to See to Believe 31 Photos Top 10 Roofing Tips Here are 10 things you must know about common roof leak locations and how to fix them safely. Frame by Frame: The Roof Check out this helpful information concerning roofing options and installation. Roofing and Flashing Tips A bad roof can be a mold generator. Check out these tips for keeping a roof maintained and preventing mold in a home. All About Roof Flashing Learn how to correctly install flashing when constructing a new house or altering the exterior of a house. Roofing Tool Basics Check out information on the benefits of these basic roofing tools and how to use them.
roof tile repair 4

Roof Tile Repair

Roofing Component Basics Roofing terminology can be a bit overwhelming. DIY Network offers basic roofing definitions that will help get your project off on the right foot. Simple Home Repairs Nagging little problems are the bane of every homeowner’s existence, and the professionals charge big bucks for repairs. Here are some fast fixes you can do yourself. Roofing Buyer’s Guide Learn how to tell if it’s time to replace your roof, and get information on the latest roofing materials and approximate costs. Tips on Solving Common Toilet Problems Master plumber Ed Del Grande explains how even the average homeowner can easily fix common toilet problems. ‘Raise the Roof’ Historic Home Makeovers You Have to See to Believe 31 Photos Top 10 Roofing Tips Here are 10 things you must know about common roof leak locations and how to fix them safely. Frame by Frame: The Roof Check out this helpful information concerning roofing options and installation. Roofing and Flashing Tips A bad roof can be a mold generator. Check out these tips for keeping a roof maintained and preventing mold in a home. All About Roof Flashing Learn how to correctly install flashing when constructing a new house or altering the exterior of a house. Roofing Tool Basics Check out information on the benefits of these basic roofing tools and how to use them.
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Roof Tile Repair

If replacement tile is required for the project, it should match the original tile as closely as possible, since a historic clay tile roof is likely to be one of the building’s most significant features. Natural clay tiles have the inherent color variations, texture and color that is so important in defining the character of a historic tile roof. Thus, only traditionally shaped, clay tiles are appropriate for repairing a historic clay tile roof.
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Roof Tile Repair

Clay tile has one of the longest life expectancies among historic roofing materials—generally about 100 years, and often several hundred. Yet, a regularly scheduled maintenance program is necessary to prolong the life of any roofing system. A complete internal and external inspection of the roof structure and the roof covering is recommended to determine condition, potential causes of failure, or source of leaks, and will help in developing a program for the preservation and repair of the tile roof. Before initiating any repair work on historic clay tile roofs, it is important to identify those qualities important in contributing to the historic significance and character of the building.
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Roof Tile Repair

Most flat clay tiles have one or two holes located at the top, or on a “nib” or “lug” that projects vertically either from the face or the underside of the tiles, for nailing the tile to the sheathing, battens, or furring strips beneath. As successive rows of tile are installed these holes will be covered by the next course of tiles above. Traditionally, clay tiles on the oldest tile roofs were hung on roofing laths with oak wooden pegs. As these wood pegs rotted, they were commonly replaced with nails. Today, copper nails, 1-3/4″ (4.5cm) slaters’ nails, are preferred for attaching the tiles because they are the longest lasting, although other corrosion-resistant nails can also be used. Less durable nails reduce the longevity of a clay tile roof which depends on the fastening agents and the other roofing components, as much as on the tiles themselves. Clay roofing tiles, like roofing slates, are intended to hang on the nails, and nailheads should always be left to protrude slightly above the surface of the tile: Nails should not be driven too deeply into the furring strips because too much pressure on the tile can cause it to break during freeze/thaw cycles, or when someone walks on the roof.