Ridge Vent For Metal Roof

Ridge Vent For Metal Roof

How to Install Ridge Cap Now that we’ve installed panel on both sides of the valley, we have to close off the ridge lines. On the right-hand side, we have an open ridge, so we’ll be installing a ventilated ridge. And on the other side, the ridge is closed. The installation of the ridge cap is the same as the hip cap. We use a Z-trim and make sure to have tape seal underneath the Z-trim and between the ridge cap and the top of the Z. You cut Z-trims for the top of your panels. You use your ridge cap to mark the ribs so that you know where to place the Z-trims. Once the Z-trim has been fastened to the roof panel, you position your ridge cap and fasten it to the Z-trim using POP rivets. If you want to finish the ridge cap at the gable, let it over hang by about an inch, make your marks, and bend it down. The result is a nice clean look, and it will ensure that water doesn’t get in between the top of the gable trim and the underside of the ridge cap. Next, we’re going to start working on the vented ridge in this application for SL-16. Venting a ridge is very important for any kind of roof and there are a lot of things we must consider. Soffit Venting vs Gable Venting Every building is different, and every house, every building has to be evaluated based on the construction and what’s taking place inside the roof cavity, what kind of insulation there is. Generally, there’s a lot of confusion about venting soffit and ridge versus gable venting. So one important note is to make sure that you’re using either a ridge vent in combination with open soffits or you’re using gable venting, but that you’re not combining the two. If you combine the two, cross airflow cancels each other out and you end up with a much less effective venting of your roof cavity. In this particular installation, we have open soffits, so we’re going open the ridge line so that we can install our panel and the profile vent material. Venting a Soffit We’re going to start by making an opening 2” on either side of the ridge. I’ve made a pencil mark 2” here and here. I’m going to snap a chalk line and that’s going to serve as my cut. Now we have a chalk line 2 inches from the center of the ridge and I’m going to cut this using a circular saw to make sure that the ridge is vented in combination with the soffit vents. A quick tip before we start cutting: set the depth of your blade so that you’re really only cutting through the decking of the wood. In this case, we have ¾” plywood, so I’m going to set the depth of the blade to give or take an inch or 3/4 of an inch. This ensures that I don’t cut through trusses. As you get to a gable or in this case, a sidewalk, you want to stop 1 or 2 feet short with your cuts. In this case, I’m going to stop just about here with my cuts. Installing a Vented Ridge Cap Now we’re ready to deal with a vented ridge cap. As you can see, we’ve made a cut 2 inches on either side of the center line of the ridge. We now have to install a ridge cap with the vented ridge material. I’m going to use an ABC vented ridge material that’s been die cut to fit the SL-16 panel. We’re going to install it using the clip system and tape seal on the underside. The first thing that we want to do is make our mark so that we know where to position the profile vent. Then, I’ll put the ridge cap in place, mark the tops of the ribs and line it up with the ridge line. I’m going to take my pencil and make a mark on my ribs. Once I remove the cap, I know that I need to line up the profile vent with the marks that I have just made. Installing the Clips The profile vent system consists of the vented material and the clips. The first thing that we have to do is install two clips per SL-16 panel and then thread the profile vent through the clips. The way that the clips are installed is, we have our mark here on the rib, so we know where the ridge cap ends and we want to make sure that the profile vent is a good 1 inch behind that line. So I’m going to position my clip right about there and I’m going to screw in through the pilot hole at the top of the clip. Once the clip is in place, I’m going to put the first screw through. Now we have an installed clip. The way it’s designed is you just lift the clip up so that we can put the profile vent in. I’m going to install the second clip so that we can thread the profile vent material through it and fasten it to the roof deck. Now that I’ve had the two clips installed, I’ve bent them both up so I can thread the material through. We are going to go ahead and install it, bring the two clips down. And all that’s left to do is put a screw through the back of each one to hold it down. That’s one, and now I’m going to install the fastener at the back of the clip, and you can see that there is a pre-drilled hole to make life a lot easier. Once that’ done, we have the installation of two clips with a profile vent held securely in place. Fastening the Ridge Cap to the Clips So now that we have the profile vent installed, we’ve used two clips per SL-16 panel. The next thing to do is put the ridge cap in place and fasten it to each of these clips. So that’s what we’re going to do now. So I’m going to position the ridge cap, making sure that it’s aligned with the center of the ridge. And the profile vent, we’ve kept it back from the line, because we don’t want it visible to the naked eye when people are looking up at the ridge line. So make sure that it’s back at least an inch, and you can then go back an inch and a half to two inches. Now that the ridge cap is in place, I’m going to go ahead and fasten it to the clips using stitch screws. So I’ve secured the ridge cap to the clip using a stitch screw, and I’m going to do that the whole length of the ridge, and then the ridge cap will be securely fastened to the roof.
ridge vent for metal roof 1

Ridge Vent For Metal Roof

March 11, 2006 Gary Urbanski Reprints No Comments Metal roofs have topped barns, buildings and country homes in the United States since the 1700s. But today’s metal roof is nothing like the familiar standing-seam tin roof of years ago. Thanks to modern technology, metal roofs are available in all colors and shades, and many styles are virtually indistinguishable from traditional asphalt shingles, cedar or slate.Ridge vents are installed at the ridgeline of the roof, and cap shingles or cap components are placed on top of the vent. (Photo courtesy of Trimline Building Products.)Metal roofs have topped barns, buildings and country homes in the United States since the 1700s. But today’s metal roof is nothing like the familiar standing-seam tin roof of years ago. Thanks to modern technology, metal roofs are available in all colors and shades, and many styles are virtually indistinguishable from traditional asphalt shingles, cedar or slate. The market for metal roofing is expected to grow by nearly 25 percent in the next five years, according to the Metal Roofing Alliance, which maintains that metal roofs are appealing to homeowners and builders alike due to their longer lifespan, durability and energy efficiency. In fact, metal roofs can last 50 years or longer, making them a popular alternative to more traditional roof coverings. Metal roofs, however, can be significantly more costly than asphalt shingles or other more traditional roofing materials. With an investment that can be nearly two to three times the cost of traditional roofing materials, it is important to install an effective ventilation system to properly protect and optimize a new metal roof. A Simple ConceptMost metal roofs, like other roofing materials, rely on static ventilation, using natural airflow rather than electric fans to create air movement. Static ventilation is a simple concept. It uses the natural effects of rising hot air from outside of the home to remove the heat that builds up in attics in warm weather, and the heat and moisture that collect during cold weather. In a properly vented attic, hot, potentially damaging air is continually replaced by fresh, cool air taken in at the eaves or soffits and exhausted at the upper portion of the roof. Creating a balance between the exhausted air and intake at the eaves is the most important issue to consider when installing a static ventilation system. For every inch of air that is exhausted, the same or greater amount of air should be taken in at the eave. When this occurs, the air will naturally flow from the bottom of the attic to the top, pushing heat and moisture out using air pressure, thermal effect and diffusion. The United States Department for Housing and Development (HUD) requirements for proper ventilation call for a ratio of 1:300, or 1 square foot of ventilation for every 300 square feet of attic. To ensure a balanced system, 50 percent of the ventilation should be at the eave and 50 percent at the upper portion of the roof. When a ventilation system is unbalanced, the Net Free Area (NFA) is greater at the ridge than at the eave. This can cause a negative airflow that actually can bring air in through the upper portion of the roof. Heat and moisture are then not allowed to escape, and additional moisture can be drawn into the house. Ensure Energy SavingsMetal roofs, especially those that are lighter in color, can provide significant savings to homeowners when it comes to home cooling costs due to their ability to reflect sunlight. However, proper ventilation is needed to ensure the energy efficiency a metal roof provides. An effectively ventilated roof can help prevent energy waste and excess cooling costs that can happen from attic heat buildup. In addition, proper ventilation can help prevent heat and moisture damage to a building’s insulation, which can affect performance. Ridge VentilationRidge vents are an effective way to achieve proper attic ventilation and are becoming a popular option for metal roofs. Ridge vents are installed at the ridgeline of the roof. They run continuously along the entire length of the roof so hot, moist air is continuously released from the attic space across the entire ridge. Ridge vents are easy to install; an opening is first cut along the peak of the roof and the ridge vent is placed over the opening. Cap shingles or cap components are placed on top of the vent, so it virtually disappears into the roofline. Ridge vents run continuously along the entire length of the roof so hot, moist air is continuously released from the attic space across the entire ridge.Design Integrity And DurabilityThe low profile that gives the perception of hidden vents is a key reason ridge vents have grown in popularity in recent years. With ridge vents, homeowners and builders investing in a metal roof do not need to sacrifice when it comes to design and appearance. Ridge ventilation allows for a straight, even roofline and eliminates the need for turbines or box vents. They are easier to install and reduce penetrations in the roof that can lead to moisture infiltration issues. In addition to appearance, it is important that any ventilation system match a metal roof’s high durability and toughness. Contractors should look for products that are guaranteed for the life of the roof. Trimline® Ridge Vents are made from a corrugated plastic material that is guaranteed not to crack, dent or damage from hail or ice for the entire life of the roof. Proper ventilation is a key component of any high-quality roof, and highly durable metal roofs are no exception. Metal roofs are becoming more popular for both residential and commercial projects alike. With the additional installation costs of a metal roof, homeowners will want to ensure their investment is protected. A balanced ventilation system can help maintain the long life of a metal roof and optimize energy savings. Ridge vents are a popular option for metal roofs as they are highly durable, easy to install, yet attractive, creating a smooth, even ridgeline.

Ridge Vent For Metal Roof

Ridge Vent For Metal Roof
Ridge Vent For Metal Roof
Ridge Vent For Metal Roof
Ridge Vent For Metal Roof
Ridge Vent For Metal Roof