Metal Tin Roofing

Metal Tin Roofing

Metal roofing pros and cons, includes tips for for evaluating and repairing metal roofs.A Guide to Metal Roofing Pros and ConsWhen my husband and I first moved to the country, I was amazed at the number of homes in our neck of the Georgia woods that had metal roofs . . . and at the number of those tin-topped abodes that displayed “For Sale” signs out front. So the next time I spoke with a local realtor friend, I asked him if he found it difficult to market metal-roofed houses. At the question, his face cracked with a knowing smile.”Anything with a tin roof is going to sell for less . . . if you can find a buyer for it at all,” he told me. “Even your typical back-to-the-lander doesn’t want to take one of those buildings on. And most of the people to whom I do manage to sell metal-topped homes tell me they plan to replace the roof as soon as they get the money together.””Well,” I said to myself, “if my friend is right, and if my area is typical, it seems that buying a home topped with tin might be one way to save a good bit of money . . . and such a move could make it possible for a would-be ruralite to settle in the country that much sooner.” In short, my curiosity was whetted, and — since we had some city friends looking for a bargain-priced house near us — I decided to learn all I could about metal roofing pros and cons. I wanted, above all, to discover why they suffer such a poor reputation . . . and if they deserve it. It’s taken some time, but what I’ve learned has really opened my eyes to the hidden benefits of tin-tops . . . and I’d like to share some of that knowledge with you here. Metal Roof MaterialsFirst of all, most “tin” roofs aren’t made of tin. You see, there are several metals used for roofing. Below, I’ve listed those you’re most likely to encounter, along with some of the strong and weak points of each.Tin. The more accurate term here is terne, or even terneplate . . . but no matter what moniker you hang on the stuff, it’s one of several soft metals treated with a coating of lead and tin. A tin roof that’s properly installed can last a good 40 to 50 years.Galvanized Steel. This is a wonderfully inexpensive roofing material that will last 60 years or more . . . if properly cared for. It’s made of alloyed steel, with a protective coating of zinc. Galvanized steel is also highly rust-resistant.Aluminum. The use of aluminum as a roofing metal is becoming increasingly popular, since it resists corrosion and requires little maintenance. Aluminum also tends to reflect heat better than steel, thus keeping a house cooler during the summer. Aluminum roofs will last about 35 years.Copper. You won’t see copper being used for roofing much these days, even though it’s by far the longest-lasting of all roofing materials (many penny-metal lids have lasted hundreds of years and appear to have hundreds more left in them). Unfortunately, this material is not only quite expensive, but also difficult to obtain.

Metal Tin Roofing

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Need a new Roof? Want something that will Last ? Metal Roofing Is The Long Term Solution. This will be the Last Roof you will ever need. While your neighbors may re-roof their homes many times, a quality Metal Roof from Metal Roofing Wholesalers will likely be the Last Roof you will ever need. Our Metal Roofing systems are designed to withstand extreme weather conditions including heavy snow loads, hail storms and wildfires. No matter the product you choose from Metal Roofing Wholesalers quality always comes first. All of our Metal Roofing products come with a 40 to 50 year warranty insuring the roof you purchase is made to last. As an extra benefit, many times you will receive homeowners Insurance discounts for installing a quality metal roof on your home. Be sure to contact your insurance agency and let them know about the new metal roof you purchased.

Metal Tin Roofing

Prevent Lightning Damage to Metal RoofsToo many metal-topped houses aren’t properly grounded to prevent damage from lightning. Grounding will provide a path for the electrical current of a lightning strike so that it will bypass the house and enter the earth, where it can do no harm. If your home is not properly grounded, the lightning can easily pass through the structure, perhaps blowing out the electrical system or causing fire and personal injury.Painting Metal RoofsPainting can spruce up the appearance of an older metal roof and add years to its useful life. Aluminum roofs don’t need painting, but galvanized steel can benefit dramatically from a new finish. When you buy roof paint, don’t scrimp on quality . . . unless you want to do the job again soon. One coat of good paint is usually adequate, but two is always better. The paint best suited for use on galvanized steel is a zinc-dust type . . . it’ll adhere well and won’t peel. You can also use the less expensive cement-based and latex coatings, but be certain that those you choose are formulated specifically for galvanized steel. Avoid aluminum-based finishes.You can paint with a brush, a roller, or a sprayer, the first being the most materials-efficient method and the last being the fastest. But before painting, do remove any rust with a wire brush (or steel wool, if it’s only a small area), and give the roof a good sweeping. Then scrub it down with clean water and an old mop. Make sure the housetop is bone-dry before you start slopping on the first coat, and pick a warm, sunny day to do the work.Metal Roofing BasicsMy intention hasn’t been so much to sell you on the virtues and advantages of “tin” roofs as it has been to supply you with enough basic information to balance against the bad press that metal roofing has suffered so often in the past. Of course, my investigations have made some lasting impressions on me . . . and when we build a small guest cabin on our property soon, it’ll most certainly be dressed out in a shiny new galvanized cap!

Metal Tin Roofing

Metal Roofing Color Charts Actual color shown may vary slightly from the coating on metal substrate. ABC products are ideal for a variety of applications, including residential metal roofing and metal siding for agricultural buildings. Once you find the color you prefer, contact ABC or your local distributor for a metal color chip to verify color selection of your metal roofing or wall panels.

Metal Tin Roofing

Metal panel roofing. The most familiar pattern of panel-style metal roofing, “standing-seam roofing,” has raised ribs every 6 or 12 inches and is applied vertically on a roof and doesn’t attempt to look like anything other than what it is: metal roofing. It has a decidedly commercial look that is favored by architects for its honest, clean, contemporary appearance; it is commonly used on homes ranging from mountain cabins to modern masterpieces but would look very out-of-place on a Colonial home.

Metal Tin Roofing

Learn about these metal roofing pros and cons before repairing your roof. If properly maintained, metal roofs don’t have to be eyesores. Understand metal roofing pros and cons, and spot “tin tops” on just about every style and size of building around. For example, painted steel “shingles” on a beautiful older house. Photo by Cathy J. Flamholtz Slideshow

Metal Tin Roofing

Learn about these metal roofing pros and cons before repairing your roof. If properly maintained, metal roofs don’t have to be eyesores. Understand metal roofing pros and cons, and spot “tin tops” on just about every style and size of building around. For example, painted steel “shingles” on a beautiful older house.

Metal Tin Roofing

Actual color shown may vary slightly from the coating on metal substrate. ABC products are ideal for a variety of applications, including residential metal roofing and metal siding for agricultural buildings. Once you find the color you prefer, contact ABC or your local distributor for a metal color chip to verify color selection of your metal roofing or wall panels.

“Well,” I said to myself, “if my friend is right, and if my area is typical, it seems that buying a home topped with tin might be one way to save a good bit of money . . . and such a move could make it possible for a would-be ruralite to settle in the country that much sooner.” In short, my curiosity was whetted, and — since we had some city friends looking for a bargain-priced house near us — I decided to learn all I could about metal roofing pros and cons. I wanted, above all, to discover why they suffer such a poor reputation . . . and if they deserve it. It’s taken some time, but what I’ve learned has really opened my eyes to the hidden benefits of tin-tops . . . and I’d like to share some of that knowledge with you here.
Metal Tin Roofing

There’s one cardinal rule to remember when doing tin-top patching: Some metals, if placed in contact with certain others, can generate an electrolytic reaction that will result in rapid corrosion. To avoid that nasty possibility, be sure to patch copper roofs with copper, tin with tin, and so on.