Metal Roofing Calculator Square Feet

Metal Roofing Calculator Square Feet

The gauge of the metal is a measurement of how thick it is. The smaller the number, the thicker the metal. 24 gauge metal (sometimes written “24ga”) is thicker than 29 gauge, which is the minimum recommended gauge for residential construction. Some roofs, such as Modular Press Formed Granular Coated roof, are only available in certain gauges (26 gauge in this case). 24 gauge is the recommended gauge for high wind areas. The gauge of the roof doesn’t affect the overall price much. The difference is usually a matter of around $100 per square. (A “square” in roofing is a 100 square foot area.)
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Metal Roofing Calculator Square Feet

To determine how many roofing squares you need for your project, enter the measurements, —rounded to the nearest foot,— into our roofing calculator at the bottom of this page. A 10% waste allowance is automatically added to the total.
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Metal Roofing Calculator Square Feet

Corrugated metal roofing is used through out the world, from Alaska to Australia to India. Its appeal owes much to the simplicity and strength of the material, as well as its availability and low cost. Corrugated metal sheeting is available in different thicknesses, styles and sizes, but regardless of the shape and size, the sheets must be overlapped, like roofing tiles, to provide a continuous and watertight finish, with no gaps through which weather can penetrate. The overlap must be taken into account when determining how many sheets to use.
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Metal Roofing Calculator Square Feet

According to the 2014 US Census, the average square footage of the average American roof is 1700 square feet. Calculating the cost of a metal roof isn’t as simple as just knowing your square footage, however. The price of metal is subject to fluctuation. Sometimes it can be pretty volatile. (In 2007, steel had a very wild period in which quotes for steel prices were good only for one hour!)
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Metal Roofing Calculator Square Feet

Multiply the length of the roof by the width to establish the surface area in square feet. For example, if the length is 21 feet and the width is 10 feet, the surface area is 210 square feet — 21 times 10 equals 210.
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Metal Roofing Calculator Square Feet

3Multiply the length of the roof by the width to establish the surface area in square feet. For example, if the length is 21 feet and the width is 10 feet, the surface area is 210 square feet — 21 times 10 equals 210.
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Metal Roofing Calculator Square Feet

Roofing is measured in squares. To figure out your roof’s area, a simple geometry can be used. The key is to be as accurate as possible since falling short, or an overage could mean thousands of dollars when planning your roofing budget. Below is a simple triangle, and the math used to work out how to make a proper measurement. Once you work through the basic triangle, we will review a typical roof, and how to apply some simple math to calculate how much material you will need for a roof used in our hypothetical example.
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Metal Roofing Calculator Square Feet

There are two main categories of roofing: sloped and flat. A flat roof is considered to be a slope of 2/12 or less. The run always remains constant at 12 inches. A low slope roof is anywhere from 2/12 to 4/12. Conventional slope roof is 4/12, and anything more than 9/12 is considered steep. Steeper sloped roofs are considered more aesthetically pleasing and last longer, too. These benefits do not come cheaply though. A 12/12 roof can cost up to 50 percent more than a 4/12 roof. This is because a steep sloped roof requires a taller chimney and more lumber for framing. However, the end result may be well worth it as your roofing material is estimated to last up to 50% longer and will require less maintenance.
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Add on any required overlap at the edges, then round up the dimensions to the next larger foot to simplify calculations. For example, if the measured length is 19 feet 10 inches, and an additional overlap of 6 inches is required at both ends, the final figure will be 21 feet — 19 feet 10 inches plus 6 inches times 2 equals 20 feet 10 inches, which is rounded up to 21 feet.
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2Add on any required overlap at the edges, then round up the dimensions to the next larger foot to simplify calculations. For example, if the measured length is 19 feet 10 inches, and an additional overlap of 6 inches is required at both ends, the final figure will be 21 feet — 19 feet 10 inches plus 6 inches times 2 equals 20 feet 10 inches, which is rounded up to 21 feet.
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Divide the total roof area by the effective area of a single sheet and round up the result to the next whole number. The result is the number of sheets required. Using the example values of a roof area of 210 square feet and an effective sheet size of 18.75 square feet, 12 sheets are required, as 210 divided by 18.75 equals 11.2.
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8Divide the total roof area by the effective area of a single sheet and round up the result to the next whole number. The result is the number of sheets required. Using the example values of a roof area of 210 square feet and an effective sheet size of 18.75 square feet, 12 sheets are required, as 210 divided by 18.75 equals 11.2.
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Multiply the effective length and width of the sheet to obtain the effective surface area. For example, if the effective width is 2.5 feet and the length is 7.5 feet, multiply 2.5 by 7.5. The result, 18.75 square feet, is the area each sheet will actually cover.
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7Multiply the effective length and width of the sheet to obtain the effective surface area. For example, if the effective width is 2.5 feet and the length is 7.5 feet, multiply 2.5 by 7.5. The result, 18.75 square feet, is the area each sheet will actually cover.
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The type of metal your use for your roof is also important. Aluminum, copper, stainless steel, tin, and zinc are among the most commonly used for roofing.
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As an experienced licensed home improvement contractor, I know first hand what it should cost for various levels — from Basic, Better, and of course the best. This Standing Seam Metal Roof cost estimator will provide you with up to date pricing for your area. Simply enter your zip code and the square footage, next click update and you will see a breakdown on what it should cost to have a Standing Seam Metal Roof installed onto your home.
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Metal shingles and metal panels are figured differently. Shingles are figured by the square foot, as they are smaller sections, whereas panels are cut figured by the panel, as each are cut to length, and run from ridge to eave.
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When comparing asphalt with metal, the durability of a metal roof is its crowning glory. A roof that will probably outlast its owner is a good investment. Asphalt is more economical, and that’s why it has the majority of the residential market at the moment. When metal becomes more economically viable, that may change. However, for now, asphalt is king.
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Now that the basic concept has been covered, let’s take a look at a more complex roofing system. In this overhead view you see both a hip-end section, and gable ends. With a more complex roof such is this one, it is highly recommended that you make a basic sketch. By doing so, it will be easier to mark your measurements, and calculate your materials. For this example we will break this roof up into sections labeled A through E.
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Determine the overlap required so that each roofing sheet can rest on the adjacent sheet to avoid gaps in the roof. This value varies according to roof angle, local climate, type of sheet and exposure to the wind. If in doubt, seek expert advice.
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5Determine the overlap required so that each roofing sheet can rest on the adjacent sheet to avoid gaps in the roof. This value varies according to roof angle, local climate, type of sheet and exposure to the wind. If in doubt, seek expert advice.
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How the roof is fastened is another consideration. Exposed fasteners are more economical. The fastener, however, is exposed to the elements which increases the risk for leaking. A good roof installer will remove your old roofing material and use a “peel and stick” underlayment to minimize this risk. Concealed fasteners cost more, but they are hidden from the elements, giving greater protection from exposure and potential leaking. They also create a more sleek appearance.
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Mark, we do not offer a roof calculator that you can put on your site. We can create a custom version for you, but there would be cost associated with it. Let me know if interested.
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Mark, we do not offer a roof calculator that you can put on your site. We can create a custom version for you, but there would be cost associated with it. Let me know if interested. Leo
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Hey Susan, Thanks! We try to keep the calculator up to date with what contractors charge and with fluctuations in material costs. We recently created a roof price index (RPI) which tracks US average roof costs, based on what our visitors calculate for their roof replacement. As far as ventilation, each roof is unique, but yea – mansards are hard to ventilate properly.
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In the figure B. above, a sketched portion is a basic triangle. As we did in the first example, measure the length of the eaves, and the vertical line from the eaves half way point to the peak. Multiply these numbers, and then divide the answer by two. (30′ × 18′)/2 = 270 square feet