Metal Roof Valley

Metal Roof Valley

How to Install Valley Trim Here you have your eave trim with the continuous cleat hiding it all, but we have a valley, so, we’re ready to put valley trim because this will change the sequence of events for what goes on here. We have two roof planes here that meet in this valley, and ordinarily on a straight eave we would install the tape seal and the offset cleat right away. In this case, because the sequence of events changes and we need to overlap properly, the valley’s going to be installed. The offset cleat will be installed on top of it and then we can run panel. Valley Trim Prep Now we have the eave trim installed with the continuous cleat, and before we put in our offset cleat we need to install the valley pan. This is what we call a “W” Valley. It has the raised V in the center, the raised W. Not all valleys do. This raised section is to keep water, snow and ice from rushing down the roof and skipping up onto the other side. It creates a break and makes sure that water, snow and ice gets channeled to the end of the valley. I’m going to put the valley in place, mark the underside of it and cut it so that it fits nicely where the two eaves join at this inside corner. I’m going to mark the valley and overhang it a little bit. You’ll see at the top that I’ve already cut it to fit the ridge line. Now I’m going to mark the underside and cut it to fit at the eave of the roof, then I’ll mark the underside of the valley, tracing alongside the edge of the eave trim. With that done, I’m going to take the valley to the table, make my cuts and come back so we can install it. Valley Trim Installation Now bring in the valley panel that’s already been cut. You can see that the edge of the valley has been cut so that it’s in line with the edge of the eave trim. Between the metal and the valley, we’re going to use tape seal to make sure that water can’t lip itself underneath and roll back up underneath the valley. We’re ready to put the valley pan in place and put a screw through it temporarily, a little higher up so that we can work on putting our offset cleats in. Something else that I need to take into consideration is the valley and where the panels stop as they come towards the center of the valley. For today’s installation, we’re giving a four-inch reveal here in the valley. To make sure that I stop my offset cleat at the four-inch mark, I’ve made these marks and I know it should stop my offset cleat right along this line.
metal roof valley 1

Metal Roof Valley

Now we have the eave trim installed with the continuous cleat, and before we put in our offset cleat we need to install the valley pan. This is what we call a “W” Valley. It has the raised V in the center, the raised W. Not all valleys do. This raised section is to keep water, snow and ice from rushing down the roof and skipping up onto the other side. It creates a break and makes sure that water, snow and ice gets channeled to the end of the valley. I’m going to put the valley in place, mark the underside of it and cut it so that it fits nicely where the two eaves join at this inside corner. I’m going to mark the valley and overhang it a little bit. You’ll see at the top that I’ve already cut it to fit the ridge line. Now I’m going to mark the underside and cut it to fit at the eave of the roof, then I’ll mark the underside of the valley, tracing alongside the edge of the eave trim. With that done, I’m going to take the valley to the table, make my cuts and come back so we can install it.
metal roof valley 2

Metal Roof Valley

As the asphalt shingles are installed over the roof deck, the shingles are extended into the valley. However, these shingles are not run through the valley area. In addition, it is important to avoid nailing the shingles through the valley metal. A chalk line is then used to strike a line from the top of the valley to the bottom of the valley. The shingles are then cut out of the valley area, “opening” the surface of the valley lining to water run-off and the environment.
metal roof valley 3

Metal Roof Valley

In comparison to a closed valley, an open valley adds an additional layer of lining into the valley. After the self-adhering underlayment, such as ice and water shield is installed in the valley, a pre-bent metal valley lining is installed. This valley material can be manufactured from any type of metal that will resist the effects of weather, acid rain, and other contaminants.
metal roof valley 4

Metal Roof Valley

In short, it is recommended that both options be considered when replacing the roof system on your home or building. If you are choosing to complete your roof replacement yourself, make sure that you consider these various factors before beginning your installation. If you have decided to have a professional roofing contractor complete your roof replacement, be sure to discuss with them how they will address the valley detail. Addressing the valley detail before work begins will allow you to consider the possibilities and ultimately get the appearance and functionality you want in your roof system.
metal roof valley 5

Metal Roof Valley

We’re ready to put the valley pan in place and put a screw through it temporarily, a little higher up so that we can work on putting our offset cleats in. Something else that I need to take into consideration is the valley and where the panels stop as they come towards the center of the valley. For today’s installation, we’re giving a four-inch reveal here in the valley. To make sure that I stop my offset cleat at the four-inch mark, I’ve made these marks and I know it should stop my offset cleat right along this line.
metal roof valley 6

Metal Roof Valley

We have two roof planes here that meet in this valley, and ordinarily on a straight eave we would install the tape seal and the offset cleat right away. In this case, because the sequence of events changes and we need to overlap properly, the valley’s going to be installed. The offset cleat will be installed on top of it and then we can run panel.
metal roof valley 7

Metal Roof Valley

It’s time to replace your roof system, and you have been looking at your roof, and other roofs in your neighborhood, looking at the different details that make up a roof system. Curious about the differences between the details, you talk with some of your neighbors and learn that each of their roofs function free of any problems, despite significant differences in the details used.
metal roof valley 8

I had a new roof put on a cedar house,it had two sets of shingels ,that were removed.New roof,New step flashing,but i see I have a small water spot on a ceiling that is under a bed room. my thought is I see quite a bit of flashing where previous roofer cut siding to install second set of shingels over the first set .could this be a problem,& how to fix it
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ABC is a leading manufacturer of metal roofing materials and metal wall panels for residential, commercial, post-frame and agricultural buildings. In this video we introduce our series of SL-16® – Metal Roofing System installation videos.
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I don’t know if it is just this area, or what but I see so many issues revolve around the valleys. Maybe it is because they like doing the “woven” style out here while out west we trimmed the shingles back & used a “W” Flashing detail. No matter which style you prefer, you should use a full 3’ wide layer of Ice & Water Membrane (I&W) in the valley.
metal roof valley 11

No matter what the age of a building there is one simple universal truth; water is a buildings worst enemy. As the saying goes, if you can keep the water out & away from the building, it can last forever. One of the most overlooked areas unfortunately happens to be your homes primary defense; the roof. Not only does it get short shrifted by many designers & architects, but then we have some roofers that top this off by trying to save a few bucks. Then to add the proverbial cherry on top, we have homeowners that barely look up, much less take care of any needed maintenance.
metal roof valley 12

Ah yes the dreaded, who needs to install step flashing or even a kick out flashing? Well in order to clear this up, the minimum you can do per code is; “R905.2.8.3 Sidewall flashing. Flashing against a vertical sidewall shall be by the step-flashing method. The flashing shall be a minimum of 4 inches (102 mm) high and 4 inches (102 mm) wide. At the end of the vertical sidewall the step flashing shall be turned out in a manner that directs water away from the wall and onto the roof and/or gutter.”