Metal Roof Reviews

Metal Roof Reviews

Hello Bob, As far as I can tell, a standing seam metal roof may indeed be a better option for you, and here is why; you mentioned that the area you live in is subject to some serious winds and hail storms that can easily damage an asphalt shingle roof. If you go with asphalt, there is a significant risk of some serious roof damage from wind and hail down the road. You may save some money today, but you may well have to replace your roof again, just a few years from now, at which point I am pretty sure you will go with metal. Why not do it off the get go!? – You could get security and piece of mind by installing a metal roof, which would be a much better defense against strong winds and hail storms compared to a 30 year shingle roof. Also, as you have mentioned, there your homeowner’s insurance premiums would decrease if you choose to go with a metal roof. Furthermore, consider some significant energy savings if you opt for an energy star rated metal roof, which could help you save some 20% to 30% on your cooling costs. I dare say that in Central Arizona, it can add up to a good chunk of change!
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Metal Roof Reviews

I am currently looking to replace my damaged shingle roof w/ metal roofing of some kind and I am having trouble deciding which type of metal roof to go with. My home is a manufactured home (also known as a double-wide in some places) so I have a very simple roof w/ the exception of 1 dormer, 2 skylights, the furnace chimney, and several vents (I know that 3 of them are for bathroom/kitchen exhaust fans). The rest of the vents I assume are for roof ventilation (there are 6 all in a row along the ridge of the house). There is also venting in the soffits. I do not have an attic, I have vaulted ceilings. At this time, I have no tree cover in my yard & my home sits facing East/West so it is in the sun all day long & my home gets very hot as a result. I live in central WI. My questions: 1) My home is less valuable than a stick built home & metal roofing can be very expensive. Which type of metal roofing would you install? So that I wouldn’t “price myself out of the market” as realtors like to say 2) I have a question about ice/water shield. On one estimate, the contractor quoted for 3 ft of ice and water shield & another quoted for 6 ft. from my reading it sounds like 2 ft inside the wall space is to code. Which would you go with? Is more better in this case? Does it depend on the kind of metal roofing ? Please remember that my eaves are much smaller than a standard house. 3) Due to the sun/heat my roof will have to endure I am concerned with “oil canning” if I go with standing seam metal roofing. Is there something that can be done during the installation that can prevent it? 4) The last wind storm in my area had wind gusts of approx. 60 mph (which is how my roof became damaged in the first place). The prevailing winds usually come out of the West. Is there something that can be done on installation to help prevent wind damage in the future? 5) Can the venting be replaced with a ridge cap vent & still provide adequate ventilation? Sorry it’s so long but thank you in advance for any help
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Metal Roof Reviews

Hi Holly, 1) Normally, a ribbed (R panels) metal roof should be considerably less expensive than standing seam. Ribbed metal roofs normally have exposed fasteners, so that is one downside, but if your roof’s slope meets manufacturer’s specs. then it could be a nice way to keep your house cooler in the summer. Make sure you go with a Kynar 500 equivalent, CoolRoof rated color. A metal shingles roof could be another less-costly than standing seam option for you. Flashing details around dormer and skylights may be tough with a ribbed metal roof. 2) Ice and water shield is more important to have for a roof covered with asphalt shingles where melted water can actually rise up underneath the shingles. I think 3 feet of ice and water on each side should be plenty. But, what about the underlayment? What kind of underlayment are you getting? You should be asking for a breathable synthetic underlayment such as Deck Armor by GAF. They sell it at Lowe’s and Home Depot. 3) If you go with standing seam and oil canning is a concern, there is a simple way to prevent it; getting mid-panel stiffening ribs, for the full length of a metal panel. Also, the wider the panel the higher the chance of oil canning to occur, so keep the width of the panel in mind. 4) Properly installed metal roofs should withstand the wind gusts of 100 mph and then some. You should check the system specs. before the installation. 5) Ridge Vent only works if there are soffit vents. So, the answer is yes, as long as you have soffit vents. Good Luck!
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Metal Roof Reviews

I’m doing the research to replace my cedar shingle roof, which is failing (it is original to the house, 1985). Some of the shingles are nearly 2 inches thick, nice quality shingles. However, we want a metal roof. The house is about 100 yards from the Pacific Ocean, so I understand from reading this site I should be looking at aluminum, and a thick gauge since I’m in Oregon with extreme winds, at times. My question concerns the fasteners. Do I understand correctly that the standing seam roof uses fasteners that are not exposed to the elements (salt spray)? A contractor I talked with indicated the metal roofs in this area have had problems with rusted fasteners even if the roof is okay. I wonder if they did other type of metal roofs, or if I’m just too close to the ocean to have metal. Also, I went to the 150Points.com web site and there are no contractors in my area for over 100 miles. The down side to living the quiet life. Can a regular contractor be trusted to properly install a metal/aluminum roof? Thank you. This site has great information.
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Metal Roof Reviews

So, is metal roofing worth the extra charge? If you are planning to be in your home for quite a while and you don’t want to go through the hassle of replacing it in the future (or if you have major ice dam issues), absolutely. You could pay for a metal roof once or you might end up paying for an asphalt roof twice. Paying for the metal roof once and having the advantages is a good way to go. While looking at long term effects, it can certainly make sense. But how many of us look that long term? The reason asphalt still rules the industry is the affordability. If homeowners have to choose between a metal roof or an asphalt roof along with a family trip to Hawaii, many people will say “aloha” to metal roofing and “aloha” to asphalt roofing.
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Metal Roof Reviews

Hi Cardel, The roofer you consulted is either purposely misleading you or does not know what he is talking about. While most asphalt shingle roofs get blown away in a hurricane, most properly-installed metal roofs remain on houses they were designed to protect. That’s why many architects prefer metal over shingles when specifying roofing systems for homes. Since most modern metal roofs are rated for hurricane-grade winds, you’ve got nothing to worry about with a properly installed metal roof. Energy efficiency and longevity are also important to consider even if the initial/upfront cost of a metal roof is higher than shingles. As far as your concern about wind uplift, most asphalt shingles roofing systems are only rated for up to 60 mph winds. Should you decide to save a bit of money upfront and go with shingles, look for a system that is rated for hurricane-grade winds. Look for a high-end architectural/dimensional (heavier and thicker grade) of asphalt shingles from companies such as GAF, Owens Corning, or Certainteed, but remember their warranties are pro-rated and pretty much meaningless. — The roofer should also use 8 nails per shingle to make it less prone to being blown away in the storm. With metal roofs, many systems are rated for 110 to 160 mph winds. I know stone-coated steel roofs from manufacturers like Gerard or Decra are popular in Florida, although I personally prefer the look of metal shingles or better yet standing seam (more costly). You can find a quality roofing contractor and estimate the cost of installing a metal roof on 150 Points. Their database of roofing pros is growing, and their roofing cost calculator is second to none. Hope this helps and Good Luck!
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Metal Roof Reviews

Hi Debbie, I’ve taken a look at the picture of your cottage house and based on the type of the roof you have, and the fact that your would like it to be the last roof, I probably would not recommend going with a barn steel roof (a system with exposed fasteners), also known as corrugated steel roofing, unless the total cost of a new metal roof is a significant deterrent to you considering going with either standing seam or metal shingles, instead. – These two options are more expansive, but offer a much higher chance of having a lifetime roof in terms of durability, longevity, and not having to deal with roof maintenance issues. – Needless to say, regardless of which system you ultimately choose, it will need to be installed the right way to derive those lifetime benefits the metal is famous for.

Metal Roof Reviews