Metal Porch Roof

Metal Porch Roof

Match Pitch of Existing Roof The covered porch roof pitch should match the existing house. Buildings with multiple roof pitches do not appear cohesive. The porch should appear to be part of the structure, not an addition pasted on. If it is not possible to match the pitch of the existing roof, use a pitch that is shallower than the roof; do not use a steeper pitch, because the form of the covered porch will overpower or contrast with the main roof.
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Metal Porch Roof

A roof protects a house and porch from snow and rain, as well as the heat of the sun. Adding a covered porch adds exterior space to a house, and providing a roof for the porch moderates the temperature and conditions on the porch. Adding a roof can create drainage problems if the roof pitch is too shallow.
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Metal Porch Roof

The covered porch roof pitch should match the existing house. Buildings with multiple roof pitches do not appear cohesive. The porch should appear to be part of the structure, not an addition pasted on. If it is not possible to match the pitch of the existing roof, use a pitch that is shallower than the roof; do not use a steeper pitch, because the form of the covered porch will overpower or contrast with the main roof.
metal porch roof 3

Metal Porch Roof

After that it was simple but repetitive work. I attached 1” x 6” boards to the top of the joists, and then screwed the corrugated metal roof to them. The most difficult part was getting the upper end of the metal sheets to go under the drip edge and roof decking of the house and to butt up against a bead of clear-drying roof cement I had put in there with a caulking gun. Also, putting a bead of sealer along the edge of the metal sheets before overlapping them was a bit demanding, though absolutely necessary. The job was done at that point. As for the corrugated metal roofing, I chose rubber washer metal-into-wood screws with ¼” bolt heads and used a ¼” magnetized drill adapted socket to put them in. That type of screw goes into into every valley at the top and bottom ends of the panels and every other valley throughout the rest of the roof, into the 1” x 6” boards placed 24” on center.
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Metal Porch Roof

Most houses have some type of porch, whether it be on the front, back or side. In some styles porches wrap around most of the house. The roof of the porch can be under the primary roof form, or it can be an extension of the roof. The posts of the porch also contribute substantially to a style.
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Metal Porch Roof

After that it was simple but repetitive work. I attached 1” x 6” boards to the top of the joists, and then screwed the corrugated metal roof to them. The most difficult part was getting the upper end of the metal sheets to go under the drip edge and roof decking of the house and to butt up against a bead of clear-drying roof cement I had put in there with a caulking gun. Also, putting a bead of sealer along the edge of the metal sheets before overlapping them was a bit demanding, though absolutely necessary.
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Metal Porch Roof

Metal Roof Longevity Metal roofs are perhaps one of the only products that will actually outlive its warranty. Metal roofs have been on homes for hundreds of years in United States. Europeans have had them for centuries. A metal roof, especially with the technology today using zinc and aluminum coatings and innovative painting systems, can last a lifetime. There are actually a few manufacturers that offer lifetime warranties.
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Metal Porch Roof

While looks are important, you want to make sure that the materials fit the structure. Since my patio cover was going to have a slight slope, shingles were out. A tar roof would work, but it would be heavy smell like a BP oil spill. I decided on corrugated metal roofing because it’s resistant to high winds, is light weight, and is structurally sound. Using corrugated metal also allows me to reduce the degree of slope, or roof pitch, needed to a mere 10 percent, or a 1 to 10 pitch. This meant the patio cover could start at the edge of the house’s roof at a height of eight feet and slope down to seven feet, leaving a clearance of more than six and a half feet between the lowest part of the frame’s headers and the ground at its outer edge.
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Selecting Materials to Build a Patio CoverWhile looks are important, you want to make sure that the materials fit the structure. Since my patio cover was going to have a slight slope, shingles were out. A tar roof would work, but it would be heavy smell like a BP oil spill. I decided on corrugated metal roofing because it’s resistant to high winds, is light weight, and is structurally sound. Using corrugated metal also allows me to reduce the degree of slope, or roof pitch, needed to a mere 10 percent, or a 1 to 10 pitch. This meant the patio cover could start at the edge of the house’s roof at a height of eight feet and slope down to seven feet, leaving a clearance of more than six and a half feet between the lowest part of the frame’s headers and the ground at its outer edge.
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Minimum Roof Pitch The minimum pitch for a roof is 1/4:12, which translates to 1/4 inch rise to 12 inches of run. However, you can only use this pitch with built-up roofing or specialized synthetic roofing. Covered porches that are near trees or in areas with heavy rains should not use a low-slope roof to avoid trapping debris and water on the roof surface.
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The gauge of the metal is a measurement of how thick it is. The smaller the number, the thicker the metal. 24 gauge metal (sometimes written “24ga”) is thicker than 29 gauge, which is the minimum recommended gauge for residential construction. Some roofs, such as Modular Press Formed Granular Coated roof, are only available in certain gauges (26 gauge in this case). 24 gauge is the recommended gauge for high wind areas. The gauge of the roof doesn’t affect the overall price much. The difference is usually a matter of around $100 per square. (A “square” in roofing is a 100 square foot area.)
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When comparing asphalt with metal, the durability of a metal roof is its crowning glory. A roof that will probably outlast its owner is a good investment. Asphalt is more economical, and that’s why it has the majority of the residential market at the moment. When metal becomes more economically viable, that may change. However, for now, asphalt is king.
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At the moment, metal roofs account for 10% of the residential market. However, even asphalt roof installers agree that metal roofs are the roof of the future.
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According to the 2014 US Census, the average square footage of the average American roof is 1700 square feet. Calculating the cost of a metal roof isn’t as simple as just knowing your square footage, however. The price of metal is subject to fluctuation. Sometimes it can be pretty volatile. (In 2007, steel had a very wild period in which quotes for steel prices were good only for one hour!)
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The minimum pitch for a roof is 1/4:12, which translates to 1/4 inch rise to 12 inches of run. However, you can only use this pitch with built-up roofing or specialized synthetic roofing. Covered porches that are near trees or in areas with heavy rains should not use a low-slope roof to avoid trapping debris and water on the roof surface.
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It was a little bit difficult to figure out where to dig the post holes. I wanted them to be exactly 9.5′ from roof edge, but the house’s foundation was recessed 2′ from the roof’s drip edge and stuck out 26” from under the bay windows. How was I going to get an accurate measurement? All sorts of neat tools I saw people use on TV shows and formulas from various math classes flashed through my mind. Here’s what I did: I stood up up a couple of posts at the roof’s edge, using a bubble level to make sure they were perfectly upright. Then I measured and marked nine and a half feet on a couple of joist boards and laid them on the ground, with one end by the upright posts and the markings on the other end showing where the hole should be dug. I did this at both edges of the ledger board, and laid two more ten foot joist boards between them. I then used my square, or angle iron, to make the corners square. I marked the spots for the three post-holes, with the middle post-hole going where the two 10 foot joist boards met. I then measured corner to corner, one way and then the other, and made slight adjustments until both measurements came out the same. With the exact centers for the post holes marked, I marked 18” circles around them because I planned to dig the holes 18” deep and wanted them to be as wide as they were deep, in accordance with local building codes. (See pictures above) I started digging the holes with a simple shovel, all the while thinking about those post-hole diggers, the ones with motors and big augers, that take two people to operate, like I saw used on various home improvement TV shows. Before I could formulate a plan for renting a hole digger, though, I had already finished digging all three holes with just a plain old shovel. Then I used my garden hoe to tamp down and compact the dirt at the bottom of the holes.